25 English Phrases For Intermediate Learners To Use In Everyday Life

Lesson summary

In this English lesson you will learn 25 English phrases that you can use in everyday life (work, school, traveling).

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Video transcript

In this English lesson, I am going to show you 25 Intermediate English phrases that you can use in everyday life. These are phrases that you can use at work, at school, when you’re traveling and in many other situations. I’m also going to show you the meaning of these phrases and how to say these phrases like a native speaker so you can improve your English speaking skills. So if you’re ready to improve your vocabulary, let’s get started!

 

Part 1 – Greetings

Number one. How have you been? How’ve yuh bin? How’ve yuh bin? We don’t say ‘how have’. We say ‘how’ve’. And we don’t ‘you’. We say ‘yuh’. And we don’t say ‘been’. We say ‘bin’. How’ve yuh bin? How’ve yuh bin? Sometimes you may also hear just ‘How yuh bin?’ How yuh bin? Now this phrase means since the last time I saw you until now, in that time you see on the screen now, what has your condition been like? Good? Bad? Sad? Most people just answer this by saying ‘Good, you?’ Or ‘Not bad, you?’

 

Number two. What have you been up to? What’ve yuh been up to? What’ve yuh been up to? We don’t say ‘what have’. We say ‘what’ve’. We don’t say ‘you’. We say ‘yuh’. And we don’t say ‘been’. We say ‘bin’. What’ve yuh been up to? What’ve yuh been up to? This phrase means since the last time I saw you until now, in the time that you see on the screen right now, what have you been doing? Have you been doing anything exciting in that time? Anything new? Anything interesting? Most people just say ‘Not much, you?’ Nothing exciting, you? Or you can say what you’ve been doing. For example, ‘I’ve been working hard’ or ‘I’ve been looking for a new car.’

 

Number three. Where have you been? Where’ve yuh bin? Where’ve yuh bin? We don’t say ‘where have’. We say ‘where’ve’. We don’t say ‘you’. We say ‘yuh’. And we don’t say ‘been’. We say ‘bin’. Where’ve yuh bin? This phrase may also be said as just ‘Where yuh bin?’ Where yuh bin? We normally use this phrase when we haven’t seen someone for a while but we should have seen them. It means in the time that I haven’t seen you, where were you? Most people just answer this by saying why they haven’t seen you. For example, ‘I’ve been sick.’ I’ve been traveling. Or ‘I’ve just been hiding from you.’

 

Number four. How are things? How are things? How are things? It’s like there’s a W that comes between the ‘how’ and the ‘are’. How are things? How are things? This phrase means exactly what it says. How are things in your life? How is your work? How is your cat? How is your wife? How is your car? Most people just answer by saying ‘Good, you’ or ‘Not bad, you?’ But you can give more detail if you want. You could say ‘Good. I just got a promotion last week’ or ‘Good. I am going to look for a new car tonight.’

 

Number five. I’ve been. I’ve bin. I’ve bin. I’ve bin. This is the fast way to say ‘I have been’. We don’t say ‘I have been’. We say ‘I’ve bin’. I’ve bin. It’s quicker and it’s easier. We use this phrase to answer most questions that have ‘been’ in them. For example, ‘How have you been?’ I’ve bin good. I’ve bin sick. I’ve bin excited. What have you been up to? I’ve bin working. I’ve bin making YouTube videos. I’ve bin going to the gym a lot.

 

Part 2 – Inviting

Number six. Would you like to … ? Wouldjuh like tuh … ? Wouldjuh like tuh … ? We don’t say ‘would you’. We put those together and we say ‘wouldjuh’. And we don’t say ‘to’. We say ‘tuh’. This phrase can be used as a formal phrase to invite someone to do something. Wouldjuh like tuh go to the beach? Wouldjuh like tuh have dinner with me? Wouldjuh like tuh go bowling? Now please note. After ‘to’, we don’t use verb ING. For example, ‘Wouldjuh like tuh going?’ No. You need to say ‘Wouldjuh like to go … ?’ After ‘to’, we use verb 1.

 

Number seven. Do you want to … ? Juh wanna … ? Juh wanna … ? Juh wanna … ? We don’t say ‘do you’. It becomes ‘juh’. We don’t ‘want to’. We say ‘wanna’. Juh wanna … ? Juh wanna … ? Juh wanna … ? This is an informal or casual phrase that you can use to invite someone to do something. For example, ‘Juh wanna get dinner tonight?’ Juh wanna go to the beach tomorrow? Juh wanna do some exercise now? Again, after ‘to’ we don’t use verb ING. For example, ‘Juh wanna going?’ No. Juh wanna go? Yes.

 

Number eight. What are you doing on … ? Wodduyuh doing on Friday night? Wodduyuh doing on Saturday morning? We don’t say ‘what are you’. We say ‘wodduyuh’. Wodduyuh. Wodduyuh doing? Wodduyuh doing on Friday night? Wodduyuh doing on Monday morning? You can use this phrase to start inviting someone to do something on a specific day. For example, I could say to my friend ‘Wodduyuh doing on Saturday night?’ If he’s free, he’ll say ‘Nothing. Why?’ Then you can invite him to do something. For example, ‘Juh wanna get some pizza?’ Juh wanna go to the movies? Juh wanna make some noodles? But if your friend isn’t free, he will probably say ‘Sorry. I’m busy.’

 

Number nine. Sounds good! Sounds good! Sounds good! Sounds good! We can use this phrase to accept an invitation from somebody. For example, if your friend says ‘Juh wanna go get some pizza tonight?’ You can say ‘Sounds good!’ Juh wanna go to the gym tomorrow? Sounds good! Juh wanna go to the beach tonight? Sounds good!

 

Number ten. I would love to, but … I’d love to, but … I’d love to, but … We don’t say ‘I would’. We say ‘I’d’. I’d. I’d love to, but … I’d love to, but … You can use this phrase to politely say ‘no’ to someone if they invite you to do something and you don’t want to go or you can’t go. You can say ‘I’d love to, but …’ and then you give your reason. For example, ‘Juh wanna go to the movies tomorrow?’ I’d love to, but I’ve got to have dinner with my family. Juh wanna go to the beach tomorrow? I’d love to, but I’ve got to paint my house.

 

Part 3 – Goodbye

Number eleven. See you later. Seeyuh layder. Seeyuh layder. Seeyuh layder. We don’t say ‘see you’. We say ‘seeyuh’. And we don’t say ‘later’. We say ‘layduh’. Seeyuh layduh. Seeyuh layduh. This is a common phrase that you can use to say ‘bye’ to someone. You might also hear people just saying ‘Layduh!’ Layduh! But if you just say ‘Layduh’, this is very informal and it shouldn’t be used in formal situations.

 

Number twelve. Catch you later. Catch yuh layduh. Catch yuh layduh. We don’t say ‘catch you’. We say ‘catch yuh’. We don’t say ‘later’. We say ‘layduh’. Catch yuh layduh. Catch yuh layduh. This is another phrase that you can use to say ‘bye’ to someone. You might also hear people just saying ‘Catch yuh!’ But if you just say ‘Catch yuh’, this is very informal and it shouldn’t be used in formal situations.

 

Number thirteen. I have got to get going. I’ve godda get goin’. I’ve godda get goin’. I’ve godda get goin’. We don’t say ‘I have’. We say ‘I’ve’. We don’t say ‘got to’. We say ‘godda’. And sometimes we don’t say ‘going’. We say ‘goin”. Goin’ I’ve godda get goin’. I’ve godda get goin’. This is a phrase that you can use to end a conversation with someone. For example, let’s pretend you are talking to your friend on the phone. There is some silence and you want to end the conversation. You can say ‘I’ve godda get goin’. I’ll talk to you later.’ Or ‘I’ve godda get goin’. I’ll see you later.’ You can add anything you want at the end of this phrase. It’s up to you.

 

Number fourteen. I am off. I’m off. I’m off. I’m off. We don’t say ‘I am’. We say ‘I’m’. And the ‘I’m’ and the ‘off’ come together and we say ‘I’moff.’ I’moff. I’moff. I’moff. This is another phrase that we can use to end a conversation. ‘I’m off’ just means I’m going. So if you’re talking to your friend and you want to say you’re going now, you can say ‘I’m off. I’ll talk to you later.’ I’m off. I’ll seeyuh layduh. I’m off. Have a good day.

 

Number fifteen. Have a nice day or have a nice evening. Hava nice day. Hava nice evening. Hava nice day. We don’t say ‘have a’. The ‘have’ and the ‘a’ come together and we say ‘hava’. Hava nice day. Hava nice evening. You can use this phrase to end a conversation. For example, let’s pretend you are at the shops and you’re talking to the cashier. When you want to end the conversation, you can say ‘Hava nice day’ if it’s during the day. If it’s after 5 or 6pm, you can say ‘Hava nice evening.’

 

Part 4 – Shopping

Number sixteen. Number of noun please. For example, ‘1 kilo of nuts, please.’ 1 kilo of nuts, please. This is a phrase you can use when you’re shopping normally for food. We can use this phrase to ask for a specific amount or weight of something. For example, ‘1 kilo of nuts, please.’ 500 grams of chicken, please. 2 kilos of beef, please. Now if you’re not asking for a specific weight of something and you want to ask for a specific number of something, you don’t need to say ‘of’. For example, ’10 potatoes, please.’ Five carrots, please. Two onions, please.

 

Number seventeen. Where can I find the … ? Where can I find the … ? Where can I find the … ? This is a phrase that you can use when you’re shopping and you’re looking for something very specific. You can ask this question to the salesperson who works at the store. For example, ‘Where can I find the laptops?’ Where can I find the jeans? Where can I find the tables?

 

Number eighteen. I would like to try this one. I’d like tuh try this one. I’d like tuh try this one. We don’t say ‘I would’. We say ‘I’d’. And we don’t say ‘to’. We say ‘tuh’. I’d like tuh try this one. I’d like tuh try this one. You can use this phrase when you are shopping and you want to put on a specific item of clothing to see if it fits you. For example, ‘I’d like tuh try this one.’ I’d like tuh try that one. I’d like tuh try those jeans.

 

Number nineteen. Do you have anything else like this? Juh have anything else like this? Juh have anything else like this? We don’t say ‘do you’. We say ‘juh’. Juh. Juh have anything else like this? You can use this phrase when you are shopping. Let’s pretend you find a shirt that you like but it’s not in the best colour. You can this phrase to ask the salesperson if they have any other shirts in a similar style. For example, ‘Juh have anything else like this?’ Juh have anything else like that? Juh have anything else like this pair of jeans?

 

Number twenty. Do you have any more of these in stock? Juh have any more of these in stock? Juh have any more of these in stock? We don’t say ‘do you’. Again, we say ‘juh’. Juh have any more of these in stock? Juh have any? ‘In stock’ means available. So if something is in stock when you are shopping, that means it is available for you to buy. So you can use this phrase when you go shopping. For example, let’s pretend you go to a shop and you find a pair of jeans you like and you want to buy two pairs but there’s only one pair left. You can say ‘Juh have any more of these in stock?’ Juh have any more of those in stock? Juh have any more of these jeans in stock?

 

Part 5 – General Phrases

Number twenty-one. Would you happen to know if … ? Wouldjuh happen to know if … ? Wouldjuh happen to know if … ? We don’t say ‘would you’. We say ‘wouldjuh’. Wouldjuh. Wouldjuh happen to know if … ? Wouldjuh happen to know if … ? This is a very polite phrase that you can use to ask for information. For example, ‘Wouldjuh happen to know what time the movie starts?’ Wouldjuh happen to know if the train station is around here? Wouldjuh happen to know if the restaurant serves vegetarian food?

 

Number twenty-two. Could you give me a hand. Could you give me a hand. We don’t say ‘could you’. We say ‘couldjuh’. And we don’t say ‘give me a’. We say ‘gimmea’. Gimmea. Couldjuh gimmea hand? Couldjuh gimmea hand? ‘Couldjuh gimmea hand’ means could you help me? This is a very polite phrase that you can use to ask for help. Native speakers use this phrase all the time. For example, ‘Couldjuh gimmea hand with that?’ Couldjuh gimmea hand with this? Couldjuh gimmea hand with my homework?

 

Number twenty-three. My … hurts. My … hurts. For example, ‘My back hurts.’ My leg hurts. My arm hurts. This is phrase that you can use when you want to say part of your body is in pain. This is normally a phrase that you will use with your doctor. Your doctor may ask you ‘How can I help you today?’ You can say ‘My leg hurts.’ My back hurts. My stomach hurts.

 

Number twenty-four. Sorry, what was that? I didn’t catch that. Sorry, what was that? I didn’t catch that. Sorry, what was that? I didn’t catch that. We don’t say ‘that’. When we say ‘that’, we stop the air from coming out with that last T sound. So we don’t say ‘that’. We say ‘that’. That. You can see when I make that final T sound, the air doesn’t come out of my mouth. ‘What was that? I didn’t catch that’ is a phrase that you can use when you didn’t hear someone and you want that person to repeat themselves. To say what they said again. For example, let’s pretend you are talking to a receptionist in an office and she says something to you but you didn’t hear it, and you want her to repeat herself. You can say ‘Sorry, what was that? I didn’t catch that.’

 

Number twenty-five. I have got to … I’ve godda … I’ve godda … I’ve godda … We don’t say ‘I have’. We say ‘I’ve’. We don’t say ‘got to’. We say ‘godda’. I’ve godda … I’ve godda … I’ve godda … This is a phrase that we use when we want to tell someone something that we must do. Something that is a necessity for us. For example ‘I’ve godda go to the dentist today.’ I’ve godda film this YouTube video today. I’ve godda go to the gym later. And note here again. After ‘to’ we don’t use a verb ING. We don’t say ‘I’ve godda filming.’ I’ve godda eating. No. We say ‘I’ve godda film’ or ‘I’ve godda eat.’ After ‘to’, use verb 1.

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