English Speaking Practice | Improve Your Spoken English WITHOUT A Speaking Partner (Airport Words)

Lesson summary

Think it's hard to practise your English speaking skills? In today's English lesson you will get to practice your speaking skills by learning airport phrases and vocabulary.

Video transcript

Do you think it’s hard to practise your English speaking skills at home by yourself? If you answered ‘yes’ to this question, then you need to watch this video.

 

In today’s video, you are going to be able to practise your English speaking skills because we are talking about traveling in an airport. You will learn some new words, some new phrases and the answers to those phrases.

 

And while you’re watching this video, I want you to repeat after me when I am pronouncing these words and these phrases so this will help you to improve your speaking skills. Okay! Are you ready? Let’s go!

 

Word #1

The first word is actually two words. We have ‘luggage’ and ‘baggage’. Say it with me. Luggage. Baggage. Luggage. Baggage. If you’re having problems pronouncing these words, it may be because you don’t know how to pronounce every sound of English. Check out our English pronunciation course in the description below because this course will teach you every sound of English.

 

When we are talking about traveling, the words ‘baggage’ and ‘luggage’ have exactly the same meaning. They mean the bags which you see on the screen right now which you use to put your things into when you go traveling.

 

Word #2

The next word is ‘overhead locker’. Say it with me. Overhead locker. The overhead locker is the row of cupboards which are above the seats on a plane where passengers can store things during a flight. What you see on the screen right now is an overhead locker. Please note that an overhead locker can be called an overhead compartment.

 

Word #3

Number three. Carry-on baggage. Carry-on baggage. Carry-on baggage is a piece of baggage which you can take onto the plane with you. Carry-on baggage is normally a small suitcase or a small bag. Carry-on baggage can normally be put into the overhead locker. Please note that carry-on baggage can also be called hand luggage.

 

Word #4

Number four. Checked baggage. Checked baggage. Checked baggage is normally the bags that are too big to go into the overhead locker. These bags go into the storage part of a plane which is under where the people sit. We call this checked baggage because you have to check it in when you first arrive at the airport.

 

Word #5

Number five. Baggage claim. Say it with me. Baggage claim. Baggage claim is the place where you get your baggage after you get off the plane. What you see on the screen now is baggage claim.

 

Word #6

The next word is customs. Customs. Customs is the place in an airport where travelers’ bags are checked for things that shouldn’t be there. For example, illegal things or things that you have to pay tax on.

 

Word #7

Number seven. Gate. Gate. Gate is the place in an airport where travelers get on and get off a plane. What you see on the screen now is a gate.

 

Word #8

Number eight. Stopover. Stopover. A stopover is when you have to take a short stay at a place while you are on a longer journey to another place.

 

For example, let’s pretend you are traveling from Australia to England. You may have a stopover in Dubai or in another place. This means you get off the plane for as little as a few hours or as much as a few days in Dubai. After that time has passed, then you get on another flight from Dubai and you go to England.

 

Word #9

The next word is declare. Declare. This is a word that you will often see at an airport. Declare just means to tell something or to show something.

 

For example, after you get off a plane and you collect your luggage, you will often see signs which say ‘something to declare’ or ‘nothing to declare’. If you have something to declare, that means you have something to tell or to show customs. If you have nothing to declare, that means you have nothing to tell customs or nothing to show customs.

 

Word #10

The last word is boarding pass. Boarding pass. A boarding pass is a little piece of paper or a little piece of card which you need to get onto a plane. What you see on the screen right now is a boarding pass.

 

Phrase #1

We’ve learned some common words that you might see or hear at an airport. Now let’s look at some phrases and the answers to those phrases that you might hear at an airport.

 

The first phrase is ‘What’s your final destination?’ Native speakers normally don’t say ‘what’s your’. They will say ‘what’s yuh’. What’s yuh. So this phrase will sound like ‘What’s yuh final destination?’

 

This is a phrase that you may hear when you check in for your flight at an airport. Check in means when you tell the airport that you are at the airport and that you are ready to get onto your flight. Your final destination means the last place you will go. So if someone asks you this, you can just say ‘I’m going to’ and then say where you’re going. For example, ‘I’m going to Dubai.’ Or you can just say where you’re going. For example, ‘Dubai.’

 

Phrase #2

The next phrase is ‘May I have your passport, please?’ This is another phrase that you will probably get asked when you are checking in at the airport. When giving your passport, there are many many many different phrases you can use. You could say ‘Here you go.’ ‘There you are’ or ‘Yes, you may.’

 

Phrase #3

The next phrase is ‘Are you in checking in any bags?’ This means do you have any bags that are too big to take onto the plane? If you are checking in any bags, you can just say ‘Yes I am.’ If you’re not checking in any bags, you can just say ‘No, I’m not.’

 

Phrase #4

The next phrase is ‘Would you like an aisle seat or a window seat?’ Native speakers normally say ‘would yuh’. Would yuh. They don’t say ‘would you’. So this phrase will sound like ‘Would yuh like an aisle seat or a window seat?’

 

This is another question that you may get asked when you’re checking into your flight at the airport. This question just means when you’re on the plane, do you want to sit next to a window like you can see on the screen right now? Or do you want to sit next to the aisle like you can see on the screen right now? The aisle is the space between the two seats.

 

To answer this, you can just say ‘I’d like a’ and then say what you would like. For example, you could say ‘I’d like a window seat, please.’ And note here that we don’t say ‘I would like a’. We put that all together and we say ‘I’d likea’ Likea. We don’t say ‘like a’. We join those two words together and say ‘likea’. I’d likea.

 

Phrase #5

Number five. Do you have any liquids or sharp objects in your bag? This is a phrase that you may hear when going through customs. Remember, customs is the place where travelers’ bags are checked for things that shouldn’t be there.

 

A liquid is something such as water that can be poured very easily. Some other examples of liquids are soda, juice, tea and coffee. A sharp object is something that can cut or make a hole in something. For example, a sharp object could be a pair of scissors or a knife.

 

So if you don’t have any sharp objects, you can just say ‘No I don’t.’ But if you do have a sharp object, you can say ‘Yes, I do’ and then say what you have. For example, you could say ‘Yes I do. I have a pair of scissors.’

 

Phrase #6

The next phrase is ‘Could you put any metallic objects into the tray, please?’ This is another phrase that you will probably hear when going through customs.

 

A metallic object is something that is made from metal. Some common examples of metals are iron, silver and gold. For example, a metallic object could be keys or coins. What you see on the screen right now is a tray. So if you do have something that’s metallic, you can just ‘sure’ or ‘No problem’ and then put the metallic thing in the tray.

 

Phrase #7

The next phrase is ‘What would you like to eat today?’ This is something that you may get asked on the plane by a flight attendant. Let’s pretend you don’t know what food you can get on the plane. You can say, ‘What type of food do you have?’ Then the flight attendant will tell you what you can choose from. If you already know what you want to eat, you can say ‘I’ll have the’ and then say what you want. For example, ‘I’ll have the chicken and rice, please.’ Or another phrase you could use is ‘Could I have the … please?’ For example, you could say ‘Could I have the rice and chicken, please?’ This is a very polite way to ask for something.

 

Phrase #8

The next phrase you might hear when you’re on a plane is ‘Please fasten your seatbelts, stow your tray tables and return your seat to an upright position.’ ‘Fasten your seat belt’ means put your seat belt together like what you see on the screen right now. ‘Stow your tray table’ means put your tray table up against the seat like you see on the screen right now. And ‘return your seat to the upright position’ means put your seat so it’s straight like you can see on the screen right now.

 

Phrase #9

Number nine. Do you have anything to declare? This is a question that you may get asked when you go through customs. Remember, the word ‘declare’ means to tell customs or to show customs something that they need to know. For example, let’s pretend you have vegetables in your bag and it’s the law to tell customs when you have vegetables. This means you do have something to declare. You have something that you need to tell customs. So if you do have something to declare, you can just say ‘Yes I do.’ If you don’t have anything to declare, you can just say ‘No I don’t.’

 

Phrase #10

The last phrase for today is ‘What is the purpose of your trip?’ Note here that ‘what is’ is normally pronounced as ‘wodiz’. Wodiz. Wodiz. So this phrase normally sounds like ‘Wodiz the purpose of your trip?’

 

This is a phrase that you may get asked when you’re at the immigration section at an airport. Immigration is where they check your passport and check to see if you have a visa to go into the country. The word ‘purpose’ means reason.

 

So this question is just asking ‘Why are you here?’ What is your reason for coming to this country? To answer this, you could say ‘I’m here as a’ and then say what you are. For example, ‘I’m here as a tourist.’ Another way you could answer this is by saying ‘I’m here for’ and then say what you’re here for. For example, ‘I’m here for work.’

 

Conclusion

Now you know some new words and phrases that you can use at the airport. If you want to learn more vocabulary, check out this video right here. Subscribe to the channel so you don’t miss any videos just like this one. If you’re having problems with English pronunciation, check out our English pronunciation course which will teach you how to pronounce every sound of English like a native speaker. This course will also help you to reduce your accent when speaking English so native speakers understand you easily. You can find the link to the course in the description below. If you’re learning vocabulary, grammar or tenses, make sure you check out our eBooks which you can also find in the description below. And follow our Instagram for daily quizzes, weekly posts, lessons, pictures, updates and much much more. And we will see you in the next video. The first thing we are going to do today. The next word is carry-on baggage. The next word is.

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